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Light thread work

Embroidery is the handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with needle and thread or yarn. Embroidery may also incorporate other materials such as metal strips, pearls, beads, quills, and sequins. Embroidery is most often used on caps, hats, coats, blankets, dress shirts, denim, stockings, and golf shirts. Embroidery is available with a wide variety of thread or yarn color.

Embroidery kundhan stone work

Skills’s creating niche applications using Zardosi Embroidery for the dresses to help improve their designs. Our Zardozi Hand Embroidery work involves making elaborate designs, using gold and silver threads are studded with pearls and precious stones. We focus our Training skills to suit the ever growing World Market for Indian handmade designer fabrics.

Embroidery zardhosi work

Zardozi embroidery is beautiful metal embroidery, which once used to embellish the attire of the Kings and the royals in India. It was also used to adorn walls of the royal tents, scabbards, wall hangings and the paraphernalia of regal elephants and horses. Zardozi embroidery work involves making elaborate designs, using gold and silver threads. Further adding to the magnificence of the work are the studded pearls and precious stones. Initially, the embroidery was done with pure silver wires and real gold leaves. However, today, craftsmen make use of a combination of copper wire, with a golden or silver polish, and a silk thread.

Embroidery cutwork design

Cutwork or cut work, also known as Punto Tagliato in Italian, is a needlework technique in which portions of a textile, typically cotton or linen, are cut away and the resulting "hole" is reinforced and filled with embroidery or needle lace. Cutwork is related to drawn thread work.

Mirror works

The use of decorative mirror or shisheh was introduced from Muslim lands during the Mughal Empire.[citation needed] However shisheh embroidery was not used on Mughal clothing but rather found only on traditional folk clothes of South Asia and Central Asia. The term shisheh means glass inPersian, from where the word transferred to Urdu/Hindi and other related languages. Contemporary shisheh work almost entirely consists of mass-produced, machine-cut glass shisha with a silvered backing. Today most craft stores in South Asia carry small mirrors purchasable for use in embroidery, which come in varying shapes and sizes